Taming the Forces that Drive Cancer

Genetic Alterations Expose Tumor Vulnerabilities

Our precision molecules hit tumors at their Achilles heel.

Molecular Machines Drive Tumor Evolution

A majority of cancers can be targeted by disrupting the machines that are vital to the dynamic reorganization of the tumor genome.

Hitting the Achilles Heel of our Targets

Eisbach’s discovery engine exploits the unique key that ignites the activity of each of our targets, generating new classes of allosteric drugs.

A Bold Vision for Precision Medicine

By pioneering drugs which selectively tame the machines that disrupt genome reorganization, we stop tumor growth and enable new cancer therapies.

Our Science

We develop smart drugs targeting the machines that remodel the genome

Tumor genomes reveal that molecular machines which reorganize chromatin and genome structure have critical and typically very specific roles in the development of a majority of human cancers.

We target two classes of molecular machines vital for genome reorganisation

Eisbach develops selective drugs targeting nucleosome remodeling enzymes and DNA-dependent nuclear helicases. Chromatin remodellers turn genes on/off or promote DNA repair by changing the way that the tumor DNA is packaged within the cancer cell. Other nuclear helicases are absolutely critical for many DNA repair pathways critical to tumor cell evolution and survival.

DNA damage activates PARPs, which unleashes a machine that is key to genome reorganization

DNA damage in cancer cells leads to the activation of PARP1 and PARP2 enzymes. This generates an allosteric signal that is key to the recruitment of the nucleosome remodeling enzyme ALC1. Upon recognizing this signal, the ALC1 machine powers the repair of damaged DNA by reorganizing chromatin structure and modulating the DNA retention of PARPs and other DNA repair enzymes. DNA damage is thus efficiently repaired when ALC1 is active. Disrupting ALC1 activity in cancer cells suppresses DNA damage repair pathways vital to cancer cells and robustly potentiates the efficacy of chemotherapies and PARP inhibitors.

Our Approach

We are a pioneering precision oncology company focused on genome reorganization

Eisbach enables the potential of synthetic lethality by exploiting the unique molecular vulnerabilities present in validated cancer targets. Our ALLOS platform systematically recapitulates the tight controls that strictly regulate the activity of our cancer-driving molecular machines. We exploit this regulation to develop targeted allosteric therapies for chromatin reorganization.

Our privately-held company was founded in 2019 by academic and drug discovery pioneers in order to enable the full potential of synthetic lethality.

We strive for game-changing and safe synthetic-lethal therapies

Now is the time to leverage the power of tumor genomics to develop the right drugs for the right patients. We now know that tumors harbor genetic fingerprints that reveal specific, targetable vulnerabilities. This concept, known as synthetic lethality, allows us to target specific proteins that are essential for the survival of cancer cells, but not normal cells. By targeting these Achilles heels, the cancer cells are unable to repair their genome and die, while non-tumor cells are spared.

A leading example of synthetic lethality in cancer therapy involves PARP inhibitors, which impact related DNA repair pathways to those we target. While powerful and effective, this approach can be challenged by dose-limiting toxicities and the development of resistance to PARP inhibitors.

Enabling synthetic-lethality by targeting molecular vulnerabilities

Eisbach combines synthetic lethality with a disruptive, orthogonal approach to drug discovery, our proprietary ALLOS platform. We focus on the molecular machines essential to the dynamic reorganization of the cancer genome. Next, we discover the unique key that is required to ignite the power of each of our machines. This allows us to systematically develop allosteric drugs that disrupt these vital molecular controls.

Our groundbreaking discovery engine ALLOS crafts drugs that are effective, selective and show fewer side effects compared to traditional approaches. We turn the promise of synthetic lethality into reality by developing first-in-class therapies, by enabling powerful combination treatments and by suppressing resistance mechanisms toward targeted cancer therapies.

Our Pipeline

Our small molecule candidates inhibit the activation of cancer-promoting molecular machines.

Eisbach’s pipeline of allosteric drugs targeting chromatin reorganization has the potential to enable the fourth wave of therapeutics in oncology.

Target 1: ALC1

Enabling novel synthetic-lethal relationships in HRD tumors that suppress PARPi resistance

Target selection

ALC1 (amplified in liver cancer 1; also known as CHD1L, chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 1-like) is a chromatin remodeling enzyme that modulates DNA damage and repair. Its expression is increased in breast and ovarian cancers marked by deficiencies in homologous recombination (HRD-positive). Its absence robustly potentiates the efficacy of PARP inhibitors and a wide range of standard-of-care chemotherapies. ALC1 inhibitors are expected to induce synthetic lethality in HR-deficient tumors, to potentiate PARP inhibitors in patients who develop PARPi resistance and to enable potent combination therapies. Available diagnostic approaches enable the selection of patients in the clinic.

Selectivity by design

Selective inhibitors for ALC1 have to potential to exhibit a wide therapeutic window, since the ALC1 gene is not essential for life, but rather plays a targeted role in situations of high DNA damage, as can be present in cancer or when a patient’s tumor is treated with DNA damage agents or radiation therapy. The critical dependence of ALC1 activity on its unique allosteric key (known as poly-ADP-ribose) allowed us to screen for and develop selective drugs with a superior safety and tolerability profile compared to existing therapies.

Target 2: CHD1

Allosteric inhibition for beneficial immunomodulation in synthetic-lethal PTEN-deficient cancer

Target selection

CHD1 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 1) is a chromatin remodeller that regulates gene expression, plays a role in DNA repair and modulates the immune system to impact the tumor microenvironment. Its absence disables the ability of cancer cells deficient in the PTEN tumor suppressor to grow. Genetic deletion of CHD1 reduces metastases in animals models of prostate cancer. CHD1 inhibitors are expected to induce synthetic lethality in PTEN-deficient tumors, enabling novel immunomodulatory approaches in oncology.

Nuclear helicases

Allosteric targeting of validated, synthetic lethal molecular machines

Target selection

A wide range of additional, DNA-dependent nuclear enzymes and molecular machines contain helicase engines that are essential in highly specific, genetic tumor contexts, while being dispensable in non-cancer cells. These synthetic lethal vulnerabilities represent a promising avenue toward the development of novel, targeted therapies in defined cancer populations.

Our Team

Celia

Celia Schell

Clinical Operations

William

William Menzer

Medicinal Chemistry & CMC

Markus

Markus Lechner

Preclinical

Dana

Dana Matzek

Animal Models

Xin

Xin Zhang

Cancer Biology

Lukas

Lucas Kalczynski

Preclinical

Kathi

Katharina Sahiri

Cancer Biology

Peter

Peter Sennhenn

Medicinal Chemistry

Jonathan

Jonathan Iorio

Project Management

Fredy

Frederik Zwicker

Discovery

Andreas

Andreas Ladurner

Science

Adrian

Adrian Schomburg

Operations

Gunnar

Gunnar Knobloch

Biochemistry

Joerk

Jörk Zwicker

IP

Junmei Liu

Cancer Biology

Chiara Writz

Preclinical

Nadine Ntaraklitas

Animal Models

Join us

We are a bold, curious and relentless team.

We will transform the lives of cancer patients by delivering on the promise of synthetic lethality through allosteric drugs.

Open Positions:

We are looking for a Translational Scientist Oncology (d/f/m, Munich, Full Time)

Eisbach is a Munich biotech that discovers and develops novel drugs targeting molecular machines in cancer and infectious disease. Exploiting our proprietary insights into the activation mechanisms of our targets, we develop effective and safe medicines, together

Your Responsibilities and opportunity

We seek a self-motivated, exceptionally talented pre-clinical and clinical Translational Scientist with a focus on oncology to boost our drug development team. You will select new indications for our drugs, implement transformative biomarker strategies, engage and monitor CROs to execute in vitro and in vivo experimental studies and be the critical clinical interface for our talented and driven allosteric platform discovery team.

About you

– Self-motivated, dedicated to success and willing to burn the midnight oil to achieve goals
– Hands-on “doer” with experience in translating at the preclinical/clinical interface
– Critical thinker, problem-solver, creative, resilient and (essentially) fluent in English
– Great team player promoting excellence and fostering an inclusive, diverse culture
– Ph.D. in oncology, virology or related molecular disciplines
– Great competence in R&D, from discovery to biomarker strategy and clinical development.

Please tell us how you will apply your curiosity to collaborate with us:

careers@eisbach.bio

News

A nucleic acid chemistry cluster to shape Germany’s R&D future – Eisbach member of the winning C-NATM cluster

 

Munich, 08.08.2022: The cluster C-NATM has emerged as one of the 7 winners in the Clusters4Future competition funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). Eisbach Bio GmbH will contribute its proprietary R&D expertise to the network and develop novel nucleic acid-based therapies for oncology.

The C-NATM network led by Prof. Dr. Thomas Carell and Prof. Dr. Stefan Engelhardt aims to develop new drugs and next generation vaccines based on nucleic acids to cure currently untreatable diseases. Recent discoveries in the field of mRNA vaccines, but also in the field of chemical biology, epigenetics and nucleic acid therapies, now give hope that nucleic acids and related molecules have therapeutic potential as new “weapons” in the anti-viral, anti-cancer and immune modulation field. The cluster includes leading academic and industrial partners. Together, they will develop highly innovative therapeutics in the field of nucleic acid chemistry. Alongside with Roche, Eisbach is committed to support the network over a period of at least 3 years.

Eisbach Bio GmbH’s expertise in drug discovery and development to address nucleic acid-modifying molecular machines for antitumor therapy makes the company an ideal industrial partner for the ambitious project at the interface of chemistry and medicine.

 

About Eisbach Bio GmbH

Eisbach Bio GmbH is a LMU spin off established in January 2019 on the Großhadern-Martinsried campus. Eisbach exploits the innovative therapeutic concept of synthetic lethality in tumor cells and develops small molecule inhibitors for the personalized therapy of cancer in genetically defined patient groups, including for indications with no therapeutic options. Cancer genomics has revealed tumor-specific genes that cancer cells critically depend on for survival. By targeting these molecular vulnerabilities, Eisbach’s inhibitors hit the Achilles heel of tumors, effectively eliminating cancer cells with minimal side effects, while healthy cells remain largely unharmed. Eisbach has developed a proprietary screening and development platform that specifically identifies allosteric inhibitors of these tumor-essential molecular machines, generating efficacious drugs with limited toxicity.

 

About the BMBF’s Future Clusters Initiative:

The German federal Clusters4Future initiative seeks to bring innovations to market. To ensure that Germany remains in the top group of innovation leaders, the BMBF launched an ambitious program to establish several regional R&D clusters that catalyze the existing research cooperation between leading academic institutions and industry.

The fourteen future clusters in total are Germany’s innovation networks of the future. Their aim is to find suitable solutions for the major challenges of our time. The topics are as diverse as the winners’ concepts: neuromorphic hardware for autonomous systems, personalized cell and gene therapy processes, sustainable marine research, quantum technology, new approaches to drug discovery and development, as well as hydrogen fuel technologies. To this end, universities, research institutions, companies, social and other relevant players in the regions have joined forces, sharing exclusive knowledge with each other and pooling their expertise into joint R&D activities.

Eisbach Bio and MD Anderson announce strategic collaboration to develop medicines targeting epigenetic machinery in oncology

MUNICH and HOUSTONEisbach Bio GmbH and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centertoday announced a strategic research collaboration to jointly discover and develop precision oncology drugs that target synthetic lethal engines key to tumor genome evolution.

The agreement aligns the drug discovery and development expertise of MD Anderson’s Therapeutics Discovery division with the innovative discovery platform and allosteric assay technology of Eisbach to generate medicines that selectively disrupt genome replication and DNA repair in cancers harboring defined genetic alterations.

“Modern genomics has revealed synthetic lethal targets in certain cancers with tumor suppressor gene mutations, and Eisbach has developed tools to pinpoint precisely where these targets are vulnerable at the molecular level,” said Adrian Schomburg, Ph.D., Chief Executive Officer of Eisbach. “We are excited to collaborate with MD Anderson to develop innovative targeted therapies that exploit these unique vulnerabilities.”

Synthetic lethality is a phenomenon in which cancer cells with mutations in certain pathways are hypersensitive to drugs targeting related pathways. Notably, defects in certain DNA damage repair pathways – common to many cancer types – render cancer cells dependent on processes that reorganize the cancer genome.

“Cancers harboring mutations in tumor suppressor genes have been notoriously difficult to treat in the past,” said Timothy A. Yap, M.B.B.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics and Medical Director of the Institute for Applied Cancer Science (IACS) at MD Anderson. “However, growing clinical evidence with PARP inhibitors demonstrates that targeting synthetic lethality is a promising strategy in certain cancer types, and we look forward to continued progress in this space.”

Eisbach and MD Anderson will leverage their complementary expertise to jointly identify targets and develop small-molecule therapies that can shut off specific epigenetic processes, thereby disrupting genome control selectively in tumor cells while sparing normal tissues. With its proprietary assay platform, Eisbach is uniquely capable of identifying and targeting molecular vulnerabilities in this machinery through allosteric mechanisms.

“Our platform identifies the unique activation mechanisms of molecular machines essential for cancer cell growth,” said Andreas Ladurner, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer at Eisbach. “With this insight, we are able to develop targeted drugs that selectively interfere with the ignition of the engines that tumor cells have come to rely upon. These drugs are safe and selective by design.”

Eisbach will collaborate with the team at IACS, a drug discovery engine focused on developing novel small-molecule therapeutics. IACS is a core component of MD Anderson’s Therapeutics Discovery division, an integrated team of researchers, physicians and drug development experts working to advance impactful new therapies.

“Our Therapeutics Discovery team is committed to developing the next generation of cancer treatments that address significant unmet needs in oncology,” said Philip Jones, Ph.D., Vice President of Therapeutics Discovery and Head of IACS at MD Anderson. “By focusing on epigenetic machinery in our collaboration with Eisbach, we are hoping to advance additional much-needed therapeutic options that can improve patients’ lives.”

Under the terms of the agreement, Eisbach and MD Anderson will jointly determine the appropriate pathway for future development and possible commercialization on any therapies that show promise in laboratory studies.

About Eisbach Bio GmbH

Eisbach Bio develops novel drugs that disrupt molecular machines essential to tumors with defined genetic vulnerabilities in the context of DNA damage and repair (DDR) pathways. Its proprietary platform creates targeted therapies that exploit disease-relevant vulnerabilities. By shutting off the machine’s engine using allosteric inhibitors, their impactful medicines prevent thereorganization and evolution of cancer genomes. Founded in 2019, Eisbach is privately held and backed by international investors.

 

About MD Anderson

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston ranks as one of the world’s most respected centers focused on cancer patient care, research, education and prevention. The institution’s sole mission is to end cancer for patients and their families around the world. MD Anderson is one of only 51 comprehensive cancer centers designated by the National CancerInstitute (NCI). MD Anderson is No. 1 for cancer in U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Hospitals” rankings. It has been named one of the nation’s top two hospitals for cancer since the rankings began in 1990. MD Anderson receives a cancer center support grant from the NCI of the National Institutes of Health (P30 CA016672).

 

More information:

Eisbach Bio GmbH:

www.eisbach.bio

Email: info@eisbach.bio

 

The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

www.mdanderson.org/newsroom

Email: publicrelations@mdanderson.org

 

Eisbach Bio receives €6.7M grant from the Bavarian Government for the development of targeted SARS-CoV-2 antivirals

MUNICH, Germany, October 29, 2021 – Eisbach Bio, a biotechnology company targeting the molecular machines that drive human disease, announces financial support from the Bavarian Ministry of Economic Affairs, Regional Development and Energy (StMWi) for the preclinical and clinical development of a proprietary SARS-CoV-2 helicase inhibitor and its backups. The funding of EUR 6.7 million will support the development of the Company’s COVID-19 therapeutics and maintain the competitiveness of the biotech scene in Bavaria as part of the BayTherapie 2020 program.

Eisbach aims to bring a safe, sustainable and targeted antiviral drug with specific activity against the SARS-CoV-2 virus into the clinic to lower disease progression and help end the pandemic globally. Using its molecular machine expertise, the Company developed EIS4363, a small molecule inhibitor of the SARS-CoV-2 helicase enzyme Nsp13, which is critical for viral replication and is the most conserved non-structural protein within the extended coronavirus family. The goal of this project is to further develop the chemical structure of the preclinical candidate EIS4363 and to further increase the efficacy in animal models. Additional research will be directed toward developing a highly effective, oral combination therapy with drugs targeting the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), such as molnupiravir.

Eisbach’s CEO, Dr. Adrian Schomburg, commented: “Our team is grateful to receive state support for the development of our drug candidates. The biotech scene in Bavaria and beyond will benefit from this project. Our research progress illustrates how Bavarian companies joined the fight against COVID-19, taking a leading role in driving innovation and identifying therapeutic solutions.”

Prof. Andreas Ladurner, Eisbach’s CSO, added: “We are determined to deliver a sustainable drug with a good safety profile. The funded BayTherapie2020 program will allow us to allocate more resources to the research and development of EIS4363, greatly increasing our chances of developing a much-needed novel antiviral for the global community.”

The financial support adds to the Company’s government-funded grants for the development of its novel targeted antivirals. Eisbach is rapidly progressing its IND-enabling work and expects to initiate Phase I clinical trials for its nominated COVID-19 asset in Q2, 2022.

  

About Eisbach Bio GmbH:

Eisbach develops novel drugs that disrupt molecular machines essential to tumors with defined genetic vulnerabilities in the context of DNA damage and repair (DDR). Its proprietary allosteric platform creates targeted therapies that exploit disease-relevant vulnerabilities. By shutting off the machine’s engine using allosteric inhibitors, Eisbach’s medicines are designed to prevent the reorganization and evolution of cancer genomes. In early 2020, Eisbach joined the global effort to fight the COVID-19 pandemic by exploiting its allosteric platform for the identification of small molecule antivirals targeting related molecular machines and engines in SARS-CoV-2. Founded in 2019, Eisbach is privately held and backed by international investors. For more information, please visit www.eisbach.bio.

 

More information:

Eisbach Bio GmbH

Email: info@eisbach.bio

https://www.eisbach.bio

Press Release

Collaboration Eisbach Bio GmbH & Technische Universität Kaiserslautern

MUNICH, Germany, September 1, 2021 – Eisbach Bio GmbH and the team of Prof. Dr.-Ing. Naim Bajcinca from the Technische Universität Kaiserlautern (TUK) announce a collaboration where they will use deep learning to track and trace arising mutations in the genome of SARS-CoV-2 and develop sustainable small molecule inhibitors that will target the virus for the long-term.

The project titled AI-based Mutation Prediction and Relevant Protein Inhibitor Development in SARS-CoV-2 (AIMPID) is focused on predicting mutations in the SARS-CoV-2 genome and developing small inhibitor molecules which target the virulent protein products of predicted mutations to block their activities. Being an RNA virus, SARS-CoV-2 is prone to mutations in its genome. These mutations will likely render current vaccines and drugs less effective over time. The tracing of mutation patterns in the viral genome will allow for the identification of the least mutable regions. This knowledge will help the collaborating teams to design more enduring, sustainable inhibitor molecules, which will help controlling the global spread of pandemic. The main tasks of the project include the prediction of the mutation rate, of the specific mutated residues among all viral proteins and the development of small inhibitor molecules against one or more specific target proteins translated from the virus’ mutated RNA sequences. One objective of the collaboration is to generate a small molecule inhibitor of a critical SARS-CoV-2 protein that has the potential to inhibit current and future variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

The project is partially financed by the ZIM Programme of the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (www.zim.de). It is a collaboration between Eisbach’s R&D department and the Chair of Mechatronics in Mechanical and Automotive Engineering of the TUK.

The development of antiviral drugs based on deep learning shall complete Eisbach’s other COVID-19 assets and will run in parallel to already developed small molecule inhibitors.

More information:

Eisbach Bio

Email: info@eisbach.bio

www.eisbach.bio

Technische Universität Kaiserslautern

Chair of Mechatronics in Mechanical and Automotive Engineering

Email: ahtisham.abbasi@mv.uni-kl.de

www.mv.uni-kl.de/mec

Press Release

 

Eisbach Bio receives EUR 8 million government grant to progress COVID-19 antiviral through Phase I/II clinical development

MUNICH, Germany, July 7, 2021 – Eisbach Bio, a biotechnology company targeting the molecular machines that drive human disease, today announced additional financial support from the German Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF) for the clinical development of its first-in-class SARS-CoV-2 helicase inhibitor. The total funding of EUR 8 million will support the clinical development of the Company’s novel COVID-19 therapeutic following the recent completion of its preclinical development.

Eisbach is using its allosteric inhibitor platform to develop selective drugs for the inhibition of complex molecular machines involved in serious diseases. In cancer, it has identified synthetic-lethal and oncogenic helicases as targets and developed small-molecule inhibitors targeting specific chromatin remodeling enzymes. Using its helicase expertise, the Company also developed an inhibitor of the SARS-CoV-2 helicase Nsp13, an RNA helicase critical for viral replication and the most conserved non-structural protein within the coronavirus family.

Eisbach’s CEO, Dr. Adrian Schomburg, commented: “We are very thankful to receive BMBF support for the clinical validation of our drug candidate, which allows for convenient oral administration. As the tablets can be easily manufactured and shipped, our drug candidate not only offers broad potential to alleviate disease symptoms, but also to globally reduce COVID-19 hospitalizations and deaths.”

Prof. Andreas Ladurner, Eisbach’s CSO, added: “Our drug blocks viral replication through a novel, targeted mechanism that is fully conserved across all known virus variants. We are determined to deliver a sustainable drug with a good safety profile that should allow treatment of anyone testing positive for SARS-CoV-2, especially high-risk patients.”

The antiviral adds to the Company’s original oncology pipeline, consisting of first-in-kind inhibitors for synthetic-le thal cancer targets. Eisbach is rapidly progressing its IND-enabling work and expects to initiate Phase I clinical trials for its COVID-19 asset in Q1, 2022.

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About Eisbach Bio GmbH

Eisbach develops novel drugs that disrupt molecular machines essential to tumors with defined genetic vulnerabilities in the context of DNA damage and repair (DDR). Its proprietary platform creates targeted therapies that exploit disease-relevant vulnerabilities. By shutting off the machine’s engine using allosteric inhibitors, Eisbach’s medicines are designed to prevent the reorganization and evolution of cancer genomes. Founded in 2019, Eisbach is privately held and backed by international investors. For more information, please visit www.eisbach.bio.

More information:

Eisbach Bio

Email: info@eisbach.bio

https://www.eisbach.bio

 

Media Inquiries:

akampion

Dr. Ludger Wess / Ines-Regina Buth

Managing Partners

info@akampion.com

Tel. +49 40 88 16 59 64 /

Tel. +49 30 23 63 27 68

 

Link to BMBF press release

MUNICH, Germany. April 16th, 2021 – Eisbach Bio, a biotechnology company targeting the molecular machines that drive human disease today announced additional financial support from the German Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF) for the clinical development of its first-in-class SARS-CoV-2 helicase inhibitor. Leveraging Eisbach’s proprietary drug discovery platform, the company has concluded preclinical development of its candidate molecule. Eisbach and 7 additional German companies were awarded BMBF funding to support the clinical development of novel COVID-19 therapeutics, as announced by the Federal Minister for Education and Research, Ms. Anja Karliczek.

Eisbach’s CEO, Dr. Adrian Schomburg, commented: “We are very thankful to receive BMBF support to clinically validate our once-a-day remedy. The tablets are easy to manufacture and distribute, offering the potential to alleviate disease symptoms and globally reduce COVID-19 hospitalizations and deaths.” Prof. Andreas Ladurner, Eisbach’s CSO, added: “Our drug blocks viral replication through a novel, targeted mechanism that is fully conserved across all known virus variants. We are determined to deliver a sustainable medicine with a safety profile that should allow anybody testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 to take this medicine.”

The antiviral adds to the company’s strong oncology pipeline, consisting of first-in-kind inhibitors for two synthetic-lethal cancer targets. Eisbach is rapidly progressing its IND-enabling work and expects to initiate Phase I clinical trials for its COVID-19 asset in Q3 2021.

About Eisbach Bio GmbH:

Eisbach develops novel drugs that disrupt molecular machines essential to tumors with defined genetic vulnerabilities in the context of DNA damage and repair (DDR). Its proprietary platform creates targeted therapies that exploit disease-relevant vulnerabilities. By shutting off the machine’s engine using allosteric inhibitors, their impactful medicines prevent the reorganization and evolution of cancer genomes. Founded in 2019, Eisbach is privately held and backed by  international investors. For more information, please visit www.eisbach.bio.

Link to BMBF press release

Collaboration Core Facility Animal Models & Eisbach Bio GmbH

The Core Facility Animal Models (CAM) of the Biomedical Center of the LMU announces a collaboration with drug discovery start-up Eisbach Bio GmbH to test SARS-CoV-2 antivirals.

Eisbach has developed small molecule inhibitors which target disease-relevant and novel mechanisms in SARS-CoV-2 for the treatment of COVID-19 and is now concluding late-stage pre-clinical development together with the CAM. The CAM is conducting animal studies to evaluate the new compounds with respect to their drug metabolism as well as tolerability. The inhibitors which directly shut off viral replication of SARS-CoV-2 could be given so far at high doses with no detectable toxicity nor side effects. Clinical trials are expected to start this summer.

The Core Facility Animal Models (CAM) at the Biomedical Center is a scientific unit of the LMU Munich providing scientists a platform to conduct animal experimentation in accordance with the legal requirements of the European and national (German) law. Core responsibility of the CAM is to care for all on-site animals subject to animal research experimentation. In addition, the CAM team supports scientists in the planning and realization of experiments as well as in providing expert advice and counseling toward legal authorities and government offices.

Eisbach Bio GmbH is a LMU spin off established in January 2019 on the Großhadern-Martinsried campus. The start-up develops novel drugs targeting essential motor proteins through allosteric mechanisms. Their technology allows to develop impactful medicines in oncology, where these machines use their engine’s power to reorganize the human genome, especially in the context of DNA damage and repair. Inhibitors targeting these machines hold great promise in treating cancer. In February 2020, Eisbach joined the worldwide efforts to combat the Coronavirus pandemic and is on-track to develop the first effective, targeted, enduring and sustainable antiviral COVID-19 therapy. The project received funding from the BMBF as part of their call to tackle the pandemic in spring 2020.